Category: Uncategorized

The Fjarrstrand Sagas: Pt. 1 (Goals & Intro)

In creating a Norse/Celtic myth-inspired setting for Barbarians of Lemuria, my aim is to move away from some of the default assumptions of the pulpy world of Lemuria… that was based upon Lin Carter’s world of the distant-future.  Gone are are tropes of scantly clad damsels in distress, half-naked and muscle-bound barbarian heroes, lands populated with exotic and alien species, nefarious sorcerers  who call upon dark powers from beyond the pale, and mad inventors who create technological wonders (and horrors).

Instead, I want Fjarrstrand to be have a grittier, more medieval, and more grounded feeling… while keeping elements from both Norse and Celtic myth.  Magic is still rare, and feared, but is seen as a gift from the fallen gods.  In this world, both magicians and priests use magic, while seers are able to untangled the strands of Fate in order to see into the future, and artificers craft and enchant items.  Basically, my goal is to  create a world that borrows from Beowulf, the Norse Sagas, The Mabinogion, Arthurian legends, and Tolkien… but with the action and brutality of a Joe Abercrombie  novel.

With Ragnarok and the death of the gods, the world-tree, Yggdrasil, itself perished.  With its collapse, the nine worlds were wracked with cataclysmic earthquakes, volcanoes, and hellish storms as the realms became intertwined.  Midgard, as the primary battleground between the giants and gods, was rendered uninhabitable.  Driven by desperation, sailors tried to brave ocean voyages westward… seeking new lands beyond the storm-tossed and turbulent ocean.  Of those who set out, only a handful of Viking crews that set out from the British Isles and Iceland found the new land that came to be called The Distant Shore or Fjarrstrand.  Two of those crews returned to the ruins of Midgard in order to lead their people to the shelter of this new paradise.

Humans are relatively new to theses lands, having first sailed here from dying Midgard nearly 500 years ago.  As a new homeland to humanity, Fjarrstrand is a largely unexplored realm.  Humans live in small swaths of coastal and frontier lands that they have carved out for themselves, while always seeking to expand their holdings.

Fjarrstrand’s ocean is strewn with numerous islands and rocky outcropping, and is home to various horrors that prey on the ocean’s bounty and on those who ply its waters.  In the ocean’s northeastern expanses, particularly in the area surrounding The Mistgate, thick fog blankets the water’s surface.  To the north and northwest, great mountain ranges and frozen wastelands teem with jotuns and other horrors.  The primeval forests of western Fjarrstrand are home to its native people, the alfar (elves) and other creatures of faerie who view these newcomers as unwelcome guests.

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The Fjarrstrand Sagas: A Barbarians of Lemuria campaign setting

I’ve posted a few times about my love for the elegantly simple Barbarians of Lemuria RPG.  At this point, it is my go-to game for fantasy roleplaying (sorry D&D… I still a lot of  nostalgic love for you as well).

Over the past few months, I’ve starting porting the rules over to a Norse/Celtic post-Ragnarok setting that is more grounded in myth than the pulpy default setting of Lemuria.

I’ll be posting rules, setting details, and my thoughts of designing the setting here; so please send any advice or comments you have my way.

 

 

Caveat Emptor… Mike Nystul’s at it yet again!

Just to warn anyone who reads this blog:

Mike Nystul, who swindled Kickstarter backers out of 10s of thousands of dollars, is trying to raise money yet again:

https://www.patreon.com/nystul?ty=h

Those who backed his Kickstarters are out of luck… as he has no intention of of making good on his previous projects.  Here’s his own words on the subject:

(H)ere is the thing. The Kickstarter thing was a disaster on many levels. One of the problems is once it failed and my personal as well as professional finances were trashed I had no resources to do much of anything to move forward. I lost everything. Not asking for sympathy here because it was the result of my bad decisions and miscalculations but i had nothing left and at one point was literally homeless. I pulled down that Indiegogo campaign you mentioned not long after it went up (I collected nothing). It would have been going down that same road, a profoundly bad idea (and in some ways in bad taste). Patreon is a different beast entirely. First, it is meant to be used to support a creator not a specific project. If you like what I’m doing – awesome! Become a Patron and we are both happy! If you don’t – don’t. The other thing is I went with the “only collect anything when I post” model rather than straight monthly. That way, if i produce nothing – nothing gets collected. There is no way for me to “fleece” anyone. The Patrons have complete control over things like monthly limits and I encourage them to use them. Going back to your original issue, yes, the Kickstarter issues were huge and horrible and I am very very sorry about them. They do not represent my entire career though and my choices were never do this kind of work again or find a way to do it as above boards as i can. People will forgive me for the failed projects and accept the arrangements I was able to make to try to make good or they will not. At this point all I ca do is do better, yes?

Please avoid giving money to this scam artist and epic-level flake.

Traits & Passions System in D&D (Part III)

TRAITS (continued)

TRAITS & CLASSES

Rather than give in-depth trait requirements for each class,  I’d keep things general.  Martial classes should have Valor scores of 12 or higher while divine casters should have Piety score of 12 or higher.  Otherwise I’d leave trait choice to the player, keeping their class archetypes and background in mind.  For example, a paladin with the Oath of Vengeance should probably have a low Magnanimity score (12 or lower) to reflect their vengeful nature.

PASSIONS

INITIAL PASSIONS

Hate, Honor, Hospitality, Love, Loyalty

These 5 passions are generated by rolling 3d6 at the start of play, though not all characters will have cause to generate all 5 of these passions.

Hate (Group or Race):  Hate is a destructive passion that may be rolled during character generation.  If rolled, the character chooses a race or group (religious, cultural, or political) that their character has an ingrained and irrational hostility towards.  A low hate score still indicates a deep prejudice and lack of empathy  towards members of that race or group, while a high hate score indicates an all-consuming desire to attack or otherwise harm members of that race or group.

I’d give the following Greyhawk races the Hate passion at the start of play:

  • Dwarves:  Hate (Orcs), Hate (Goblinoids)
  • Elves: Hate (Orcs), Hate (Drow)
  • Gnomes: Hate (Kobolds)

Drow elf player characters, on the other hand, would not hate elves in general but would probably hate the Drow faction or family responsible for their exile.

Half-Orc characters would probably be greeted with some mistrust by elves and dwarves but, in the interest keeping the game running smoothly, would not have their Hate passion apply to half-orcs.

Honor: Honor is the passion that sets heroic character apart from ordinary people. It is a combination of personal dignity, integrity, and pride.

All characters would have a starting Honor score that would be modified as follows:

  • Lawful alignment: +2
  • Chaotic alignment: -2
  • Good alignment: +2
  • Evil alignment: -2
  • Background: +2 to -2 (a chivalrous knight would have a+2 bonus while a charlatan would have a -2 penalty)

Performing the actions listed below clearly and invariably diminishes honor:

  • Attacking a helpless foe -1
  • Cowardice –1
  • Desertion from a battle, quest, or mercenary contract  –1
  • Plundering a holy place of your faith or allied faith –1
  • Killing an helpless holy person of your religion –2
  • Kidnapping or raping –2
  • Breaking an oath –2
  • Treachery against a member of your family –3
  • Treason (against your lord) –4
  • Killing a kinsman –5

Characters with an Honor score of 14 or higher are noted for their honorable behavior while those with an Honor score of 7 or less are seen as dishonorable scoundrels.

Hospitality:  This passion measures how much your character respects the time-honored institution of hospitality. In cases of great passion (14 or higher), a proponent of this practice might feel bound to correct others’ inhospitable behavior, and perhaps even to seek out and destroy those who break the rules of hospitality. On the other hand, anyone with a disregard for hospitality (less than 7) is likely to steal without compunction.

Love (Person, Patron, or Group):  Love is an emotional bonding or attraction felt by one individual for another individual, group, or deity. A character may have many loves, but it is best if only 1 or 2 warrant this passion.

Loyalty (Lord or Order):  Characters who serve some lord or order should roll this trait at the start of play.  Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • feudal lord
  • an order of knights
  • a religious order
  • a supernatural patron
  • a guild
  • a god
  • a wealthy sponsor

A low loyalty score indicates that the character serves his own needs before those of his lord or order and, as such, draws little inspiration from service to that lord or order.

TRAIT & PASSION BENEFITS

Character who roleplay according to their character’s traits and passions should be rewarded with Inspiration (PHB 126) and, over time, will gain renown (or infamy) through their actions and ideals.  Players who consistently act in accordance with their notable traits and passions (those with score of 14 or higher, or of 7 or lower) should gain a small XP award at the end of each session.  I’d recommend 50 XP multiplied by the character’s proficiency bonus.

Invoking a Passion:  Furthermore, when a character’s passion is threatened (i.e. their honor is impugned,  their paramour is taken captive, or they combat a hated enemy) they may seek to invoke that passion by succeeding at  a DC 15 check, modified by their passion score modifier and proficiency modifier.

  • On a failed roll the character suffers disadvantage on all attack rolls, saves, and ability checks for the length of the encounter.  Their passion score is automatically lowered by 1 point.
  • On a successful roll the character gains advantage on all attack rolls, saves, and ability checks for the length of the encounter.
  • On a fumble (a roll of a natural “1”) the character’s passion score is automatically lowered by 2 points and the character gains long-term Madness as per page 258-259 of the DMG.
  • On a critical (a roll of a natural “20”) the character’s passion score is automatically raised by 1 point and the character gains advantage on all attack rolls, saves, and ability checks for the length of the encounter.

Because invoking a passion is arduous, it may only be attempted once per long rest.

roslofthekeepontheborderlands

Traits & Passions System in D&D (Part II)

This is a continuation of my last blog post.

ORDINARY TRAITS

Traits between 8 and 13 represent the average range of traits.  When faced with tests tied to these, the player may forego the trait check and use free will to determine a course of action.

Characters who consistently act a certain way will eventually have the appropriate trait raised due to the rules below.

FAMOUS TRAITS AND PASSIONS

Only famous traits (i.e., those with a value of 14 or higher, or of 7 or lower) are noteworthy, and such traits must be checked with a die roll whenever character behavior is challenged in a crisis.  This does not mean that trait rolls must be used whenever the character makes any decision in the game. And even characters with famous characteristics are allowed free choice of behavior except when the plot demands otherwise. The DM should request trait rolls only when a trait is tested in an important situation. In general, trait rolls simulate situations in which a crisis forces the character to act unconsciously.

TRAITS CHECKS

When characters face moral dilemmas and/or are tempted to act in a particular manner, the DM may call for a trait check.

Since traits define character personality, they must be consulted whenever the DM feels them necessary. In crises, it is assumed, individuals act according to their character, not spontaneous and ambiguous choices. Custom and training triumph over instinct. Players may not want their characters to do something dictated by a die roll, but free choice is not always possible.

Trait checks are handled much like ability checks (PHB 172).  When a test of a particular trait is called for, the DM determines the difficulty of that check.  The player then rolls a d20, adding the modifier for the relevant trait score and their proficiency modifier…  as experience tempers judgement.

Typical Difficulty Classes
Task Difficulty                          DC
Very easy                                 5
Easy                                          10
Medium                                   15
Hard                                         20
Very hard                                 25
Nearly impossible                  30

If the total equals or exceeds the DC, the trait check is a success – the character overcomes the challenge at hand and acts in accordance with that trait. Otherwise, it’s a failure, which means the character may give into their vices.  A natural “20” indicates a critical success while a natural “1” indicates a fumble. See the table below for the effects of success and failure at a trait check.

Roll Result and Effect

Critical Success: The trait increases by one, and the character must act strongly in accordance with the trait unless he succeeds at a Wisdom saving throw with the same DC.  If this save succeeds, the character may act freely but reduces the trait by 1 point if he fails to act in accordance with it.

Success:  The character may act in accordance with the trait but is not required to. The player may decide precisely what action ensues within that limitation.

Failure:  Failure indicates the player fails to act in accordance with the checked trait unless he succeeds at a Wisdom saving throw with the same DC.  If this save succeeds, the character may act freely.

Fumble:  The trait is immediately reduced by one 1 point and the character immediately acts against that trait unless he succeeds at a Wisdom saving throw with the same DC.  If this save succeeds, the character may act freely and doesn’t suffer a loss to the checked trait.

Example:  Hromund Hammerhand, a level  3 dwarven paladin renowned for his purity has a Chastity score of 16 and  encounters a succubus in the form of a beautiful dwarven maiden. The DM asks the  player to make a Chasity roll with a DC of 15.   His bonus to this roll is +5 but he rolls a “4” on his trait check.  Unless he rolls a successful Wisdom save Hromund will give in to the succubus’ charms.

The following chart shows the effects of passed and failed trait rolls.  The character acts accordingly:

Trait Checked Failed Check (Vice Exhibited) Successful Check (Virtue Exhibited)
Chastity Lustful Chaste
Constancy Arbitrary Just
Diligence Slothful Energetic
Generosity Selfish Generous
Honesty Deceitful Honest
Magnanimity Vengeful Forgiving
Mercy Cruel Merciful
Modesty Proud Modest
Piety Worldly Pious
Prudence Reckless Prudent
Temperance Indulgent Temperate
Trust Suspicious Trusting
Valor Cowardly Valorous

berserker sword

Family Background by Homeland & Culture (Pendragon 5th Edition)

FATHER’S CLASS

13

14

INHERITED GLORY, SKILLS, TRAITS, PASSIONS & OUTFIT

Legionarius          

Glory:  3d6+50

18 skills points, Awareness +1, Spear +1, Sword +1, Grapple +2, Dagger +3

Proud +1, Prudent +1d3, Selfish +1d3+2, Cruel +1d6, Valorous +1, Honor +1d3, Loyalty (Lord) +1

Legionarius Outfit

 

Squire

Glory:  6d6

20 skill points, Alertness +2, Heraldry +2 (substitute Recognize in the Uther – Anarchy periods), Horsemanship +2

Energetic +1d3, Modest +1d3, Prudent +1d3, Valorous +1d6, Loyalty (Lord) +3

Outfit 1 (Footsoldier’s Outfit for Irish and Pictish characters)

 

Mercenary Knight

Glory:  6d6+100

20 skill points, Sword +3, any other weapon +3

Cruel +1d6, Valorous +1d3

Outfit 2 (Outfit 3 for Roman characters)

 

Warrior

Glory:  6d6+50

24 skill points, Awareness +2, Spear +2, Cultural Weapon +3

Proud +1, Reckless +1d3, Valorous +1d3+2, Honor +1d6, Loyalty (Lord) +3

Cultural Warrior Outfit

 

Family Chieftain

Glory:  2d6+100

28 skill points, Cultural Weapon +2

Love (family) +1d3, Valorous +1d3, Honor +1d3, Loyalty (Lord) +1d3+3

Cultural Warrior Outfit

 

Tribal or Clan Chieftain

Glory:  6d6+250

30 skill points, Cultural Weapon +3

Valorous +1d3, Loyalty (Clan) 2d6+6, Honor +1d6

Cultural Warrior Outfit

 

Bachelor Knight

Glory:  6d6+250

26 skill points

Valorous +1, Loyalty (Lord) +3, Honor +1

Outfit 3 (Outfit 2 for Frankish, Irish, Pictish & Saxon characters)

 

Vassal Knight

Glory:  6d6+250

30 skill points

Valorous +2, Loyalty (Lord) +4, Honor +1

Outfit 3 (Outfit 2 for Frankish, Irish, Pictish & Saxon characters)

 

Banneret Knight

Glory:  6d6+250

32 skill points

Valorous +3, Loyalty (Lord) +5, Honor +1d3

Two rolls on the Luck table

Outfit 3 (Outfit 2 for Frankish, Pictish & Saxon characters)

 

Officer

Glory:  6d6+300

26 skill points plus see below

Valorous +1, Loyalty (Lord) +4, Honor +1d3

  • Seneschal: Stewardship +4, Intrigue +2, Hospitality +1d3
  • Marshal: Battle +3, Valorous +1d3
  • Butler: Courtesy +3, Intrigue +1, Generous +3
  • Chamberlain: Read (Latin) +4, Heraldry +2 (substitute Recognize in the Uther – Anarchy periods)
  • Constable: Tourney +3 (substitute Battle in the Uther – Anarchy periods), Horsemanship +2
  • Forester: Awareness +2, Falconry +2, Hunting +4
  • Castellan: Battle +2, Courtesy +2, Stewardship +2

Outfit 4 (Outfit 3 for Frankish & Saxon characters)

 

Lord

Glory:  6d6+300

26 skill points, Courtesy +2, Heraldry +2 (substitute Recognize in the Uther – Anarchy periods), Intrigue +2, Battle +2, Sword +2, Spear +2

Proud +1d3, Loyalty (Lord) +6, Honor +3, Valorous +1d3

Three rolls on the Luck table

Outfit 4 (Outfit 3 for Saxon characters)

 

Free Holding Knight

Glory:  6d6+250

26 skill points, Stewardship +2, Courtesy +2, Intrigue +2, Battle +2, Sword +2

Proud +1d3, Loyalty (Lord) +1d3, Honor +1d3, Valorous +1d3

Two rolls on the Luck table

Outfit 4

 

INHERITED OUTFITS

 

UTHER-BOY KING PERIOD

Legionarius Outfit

Leather and open helm (4 pt), spear, legionary shield (9 pt), sword, dagger, clothing worth 60d.

Cymric Warrior’s Outfit

Leather armor (4 pt), spear, shield, sword, clothing worth 90d.

Pictish Warrior’s Outfit

No armor, 2 great spears, 5 javelins, great axe, dagger, clothing worth 10d.

Irish Warrior’s Outfit

Leather armor (4 points), 2 spears, shield, sword, dagger, clothing worth 60d.

Saxon Warrior’s Outfit

Cuirbouilli (6 pt), 2 spears, shield, sword, great axe, 3 javelins, dagger, clothing worth 60d.

Outfit 1

Rouncy, leather armor (4 pt), spear, shield, sword, dagger, clothing worth 90d.

Outfit 2

Charger, cuirbouilli (6 pt), spear, shield, sword, dagger, clothing worth 120d.

Oufit 3

Charger, rouncy, Norman chainmail (10 pt), 2 spears, shield, sword, dagger, clothing worth 1L.

Oufit 4

Charger, palfrey, 2 rouncies, Norma chainmail (10 pt), 2 spears, shield, sword, any one other available weapon, dagger, clothing worth 2L, 120d in money.

Outfit 5

2 chargers, palfrey, 2 rouncies, Norman chainmail (10 pt), 2 spears, shield, sword, any one other available weapon, dagger, clothing worth 4L, 1L in money.

Oufit 6

2 chargers, palfrey, 2 rouncies, Norman chainmail (10 pt), 2 spears, shield, sword, any one other available weapon, dagger, clothing worth 2L, 120d in money.

 

CONQUEST-TWILIGHT PERIOD

Foorsoldier’s Outfit

Leather armor (4 pt), great spear, sword or other cultural weapon, dagger, clothing worth 80d.

Cymric Warrior’s Outfit

Leather armor (4 pt), spear, shield, sword, dagger, clothing worth 120d.

Pictish Warrior’s Outfit

No armor, 2 great spears, 5 javelins, great axe, dagger, clothing worth 10d.

Irish Warrior’s Outfit

Leather armor (4 points), 2 spears, shield, sword, dagger, clothing worth 60d.

Saxon Warrior’s Outfit

Cuirbouilli (6 pt), 2 spears, shield, sword, great axe, 3 javelins, dagger, clothing worth 60d.

Outfit 1

2 rouncies, cuirbouilli (6 pt), spear, shield, sword, dagger, clothing worth 120d.

Outfit 2

Charger, 2 rouncies, Norman chainmail (10 pt), 2 spears, shield, sword, 5 jousting lances, dagger, clothing worth 1L.

Oufit 3

Charger, palfrey, rouncy, reinforced chainmail armor (12 pt), 2 spears, shield, sword, any one other weapon, 5 jousting lances, dagger, clothing worth 2L., 1L in money, 1 squire.

Oufit 4

1 Andalusian charger, palfrey, courser, 2 rouncies, reinforced chainmail armor (12 pt), 2 spears, shield, sword, any one other weapon, 5 jousting lances, dagger, clothing worth 4L., 2L in money, 2 squires.

Outfit 5

1 destrier, 1 Barb charger, 1 Camargue palfrey, 1 rouncy, 1 sumpter, partial plate armor (14 pt), leather hunting armor (2 pts), 6 spears, 2 shields, 2 swords, any two other weapons, 10 jousting lances, dagger, clothing worth 8L., 2L in money, 3 squires.

Oufit 6

1 Frisian destrier, 1 Andalusian chargers, 1 Camargue palfrey, 2 rouncies, 1 sumpter, partial plate armor (14 pt), engraved hunting leather armor (2 pt), 6 spears, 2 shields, 2 swords, any four other weapons, 10 jousting lances, dagger, clothing worth 10L., 3L in money, 4 squires.

 

LUCK BENEFITS

 

d20 roll CYMRIC d20 roll AQUITANIAN d20 roll FRANKISH
01 3d20 denarii. 01 3d20 +60 denarii. 01 3d20 +60 denarii.
02-03 3d20+120 denarii. 02 1 Librum (240 denarii). 02-03 1 Librum (240 denarii).
04-06 1 Librum (240 denarii). 03-04 1d3 Librum. 04 1d3 Librum.
07 1d3 Librum. 05 1d6 Librum. 05 1d6 Librum.
08 1d6 Librum. 06-07 Your forebear died heroically: +100 Glory. 06 Your forebear died heroically: +100 Glory.
09 Family heirloom:  Christian* sacred relic, roll a d6 (1=finger, 2=tears, 3-4=hair, 5=bone fragment, 6=blood) 08-10 Your ancestor was a Visigoth king (1d6+2 generations back):  +100 Glory and a jeweled sword worth 1d3 Librum. 07-10 Family heirloom:  a brooch.  Roll 1d6 for value (1-3 = silver worth 1 L., 4-5 = gold worth 3 L., 6 = silver with diamond worth 5 L.).
10 Family heirloom:  Ancient bronze sword (+1 to Sword skill when used).  Breaks as a non-sword in combat due to its weak blade.  Worth 2L. 11-12 A sumpter 11-13 A magical healing potion that heals 1d6 damage once.  Priceless.
11 Family heirloom:  Blessed spear (+1 modifier to Spear skill when used, until broken).  Worth 120 denarii. Note: Replace with a lance after the Anarchy period 13-15 A rouncy 14-15 A sumpter
12 Family heirloom:  Decorated saddle.  Worth 1 Librum. 16 A charger 16 A rouncy
13 Family heirloom:  Engraved finger ring.  Roll 1d6 for value (1-4 = silver ring worth 120 denarii, 5-6 = gold ring worth 2 L.). 17 A Barb courser 17 A charger
14 Family heirloom:  Armband.  Roll 1d6 for value (1-5 = silver band worth 1 L., 5-6 = gold band worth 8 L.). 18 An Andalusian charger 18 An Andalusian charger
15 Family heirloom:  Valuable cloak worth 1 Librum.  Roll 1d6 for origin (1-2 = Byzantine, 3=German, 4-5=Spanish, 6=Roman). 19 Upgrade your Outfit by 1 19 Upgrade your Outfit by 1
16 A magical healing potion that heals 1d6 damage once.  Priceless. 20 Roll twice more, re-rolling further rolls of “20”. 20 Roll twice more, re-rolling further rolls of “20”.
17-18 A charger
19 Upgrade your Outfit by 1
20 Roll twice more, re-rolling further rolls of “20”.
* Pagan Cymri gain 1d6 L. in place of this relic.

 

d20 roll IRISH & MANX d20 roll PICT d20 roll ROMANS
01 3d20 +60 denarii. 01-03 3d20 denarii. 01 3d20 +60 denarii.
02 1 Librum (240 denarii). 04 Your forebear died heroically: +100 Glory. 02-03 1 Librum (240 denarii).
03-04 Your forebear died heroically: +100 Glory. 05 A rouncy 04 1d3 Librum.
05 A Connacht rouncy. 06-10 You bear a magical tattoo that provides 2 points of armor 05-06 1d6 Librum.
06-10 A charger 11 You have a magical charger, +1 movement rate and +1d3 armor 07-10 Your ancestors came to Britain from Rome(1d6+2 generations back): +100 Glory.
11 An Irish courser 12 1d3 magical healing potions that heal 1d6 damage.  Priceless. 11-12 A charger
12-16 Your are a descendant of a king (1d6+2 generations back):  +150 Glory 13 The faeries have gifted you with a magical great spear of impressive power, +2 to Spear skill until broken.  +100 Glory.  Priceless. 13 An Andalusian charger
17 1d3 magical healing potions that heal 1d6 damage.  Priceless. 14-15 1d6 magical healing potions that heal 1d6 damage.  Priceless. 14 A Barb courser
18 A love potion.  Priceless. 16 1d3 love potions.  Priceless. 15-16 A magical healing potion that heals 1d6 damage once.  Priceless.
19 Upgrade your Outfit by 1 17-19 1d3 strong healing potions (each heals 6 damage).  Priceless. 17-18 A strong healing potion that heals 6 points of damage once.  Priceless.
20 Roll twice more, re-rolling further rolls of “20”. 20 Roll twice more, re-rolling further rolls of “20”. 19 Upgrade your Outfit by 1
20 Roll twice more, re-rolling further rolls of “20”.

 

d20 roll SAXON d20 roll SAXON (continued)
01-03  3d20 denarii. 14 You have a part-share in a ship.  Check with the gamemaster for details.
04 1d3 Librum. 15 You have a blessed axe.  +1 to Great Axe skill when used.  Breaks normally.  Worth 2 Librum.
05-07 Wotan is your ancestor: +200 Glory 16-18 A magical healing potion that heals 1d6 damage once.  Priceless.
08-10 A sumpter 19 Upgrade your Outfit by 1
11 A rouncy 20 Roll twice more, re-rolling further rolls of “20”.
12-13 A charger



 

Names by Culture (Pendragon 5th Edition)

Aquitanian
Aquitanian names reflect the heavy influences of the Franks upon the Roman and Celtic inhabitants of these lands. As such, their names contain Celtic, Germanic, and Roman elements.

Male Names: Use Frankish name and add the following: Aalard, Acostant, Alexis, Argius, Barnard, Beranger, Bovert, Burcan, Cadmar, Corneus, Danain, Daniel, Dragan, Elad, Emeric, Evrard, Gobert, Gundahar, Henri, Jaufre, Jules, Lancel, Lucan, Lucas, Morien, Nicholas, Patric, Remi, Renauld, Roger, Serin, Sevin, Thibaud, Thierry, Thomas, Victor, Xavier.

Female Names: Use Frankish name and add the following: Armide, Babette, Bethilie, Blandine, Brienne, Carelia, Cecile, Danielle, Diane, Edith, Elianor, Ethaine, Felise, Heloise, Helena, Irene, Jeanne, Liaze, Liliane, Lusiane, Lynn, Margot, Olivia, Priscilla, Raisende, Roxane, Sibille, Ursanne, Verrine.

Surnames: Like the Franks and Saxon, Aquitanians only use personal names. In place of surnames, noteworthy Aquitanian knights and nobles adopt nicknames based upon their homeland (i.e. de Ganis), traits (i.e. the Just), appearance (i.e. The Fair), or deeds (i.e. of the Long Hunt).
Some families, usually aristocratic, were identified by collective name taken from a famous forebear such as the Athelings, Gumeningas, Besingas, Baducings, Guthlacingas, the final ‘-ing’ element signifying ‘people of’.

Cymri
Cymric names are similar to their modern Welsh equivalments.

Male Names: Addonwy, Aeron, Afan, Aneirin, Aeddan, Amig, Amlyn, Athrwys, Arddur, Buddfannan, Blaen, Bledri, Bradwen, Bleddig, Cadfannan, Cadfael, Cadwallon, Cilydd, Cynon, Cynfan, Cyfulch, Cynrain, Cunvelyn, Caradoc, Cibno, Ceredig, Cadlew, Cynwal, Clydno, Cynhafal, Dafydd, Defi, Dwyai, Edar, Edern, Eiddef, Erthgi, Elad, Eudaf, Biffin, Gwefrfawr, Gwegon, Gwion, Gwyn, Gwarddur, Gwern, Gwyleged, Gwrien, Gwraid, Gorthyn, Gwaednerth, Gwengad, Brugyn, Gwenabwy, Gwrfelling, Gwair, Graid, Geriant, Gwanon, Hyfaidd, Hywel, Ieuan, Llywel, Marchlew, Moried, Morien, Madog, Morial, Mynyddog, Merin, Neilyn, Nwython, Nai, Nerthaid, Neddig, Nidian, Owain, Padern, Pedrog, Ricerch, Rhodri, Rhufon, Rhun, Sawel, Seriol, Sywno, Tathal, Tathan, Tudfwlch, Tyngyr, Uren, Uwain, Ysgarran.

Female Names: Adwen, Annest, Angarad, Arianwen, Briant, Duddug, Collwen, Dwynwen, Eleri, Ffraid, Glesig, Glesni, Gwen, Heledd, Indeg, Leri, Lleucu, Llio, Melangell, Meleri, Nest, Nia, Tydfil

Surnames: Cymric last names are patronymic, derived from the father or an ancestor. Commoners sometimes take their surname from nicknames or, rarely, from occupational names.
Patronymic surnames link the person’s proper name to his or her father’s by adding ap, ab, or mab (son of) or ferch (daughter of) between their proper name and that of their father. As such Neifion, son of Adern, becomes Neifion ap Adern while Nia, daughter of Uren, is called Nia ferch Uren. An accounting of one’s lineage is patrilineal, appending the names of son (or daughter) to father, then a grandfather, and so on. As such Llewelyn ap Dafydd ab Ieuan ap Griffith ap Meredith denotes Llewelyn, son of Dafydd, son of Ieuan, son of Griffith, son of Meredith. “Ap” is sometimes abbreviated to by simply adding the letter “P” or “B” to the surname of one’s father: ap Owen becomes Bowen, ap Rhys becomes Price or Bryce, or ap Hywel becomes Powell.

Pronunciation Guide: Cymric vowels are long in stressed syllables. Stress is always on the next-to-last syllable, except in very long names, where there is a second, lighter stress on the first syllable to help move the word along.
(c) is roughly equivalent to English k
( w ) is roughly equivalent to English oo
(dd) is roughly equivalent to English th, as in the
(ff) is roughly equivalent to English
(f) is roughly equivalent to English v
(ll) is the “Welsh sound”, an aspirated l-sound. Put the front of your tongue on the roof of your mouth and blow the air out the sides, between your teeth.

Frankish
Male Names: Adalmund, Aimon, Amalric, Arbogast, Archembaud, Arigius, Aurel, Baldric, Bardrim, Baudouin, Bernier, Bertmund, Brantome, Bretonnet, Brunehaut, Bruyant, Carolus, Childeric, Chlodobert, Clovis, Ernaut, Eustache, Fierbras, Fluvant, Gaidon, Galafre, Galien, Gaumadras, Gautier, Gilbert, Gilles, Girard, Godfroi, Grimoald, Gui, Guibert, Guillame, Guinemant, Gundovald, Gunthar, Hardouin, Harde, Hernaudin, Hernaut, Hervis, Hubert, Huges, Huidemar, Ingund, Isore, Jacquelin, Jean, Marc, Jerome, Jourdain, Julian, Landri, Leomund, Leovigild, Lothar, Louis, Maugis, Mercadier, Merovech, Milon, Naimes, Namus, Odovacer, Pepin, Piccolet, Philippe, Pierre, Renaud, Renier, Renouart, Richard, Robert, Roderic, Samson, Sigibrand, Sigimund, Tancred, Thierry, Theudebald, Theuderic, Varocher, Vincent, Vivien, Yon, Yves.

Female Names: Adeline, Aelis, Agnes, Aiglante, Alais, Alicia, Alienor, Alix, Amalon, Amalgard, Ameline, Anseir, Aregund, Aude, Basina, Beatrix, Belle, Bellisent, Berthild, Blond, Brunhild, Brunissent, Catherine, Cecilia, Clarissa, Clothild, Edith, Elisabeth, Erembourg, Ermengart, Esclarmonde, Flore, Fredegund, Galienne, Genevieve, Guiborc, Helissent, Helouise, Hermengart, Hildegard, Isabelle, Jacqueline, Jehanne, Jeannette, Joie, Josiane, Laurence, Lubias, Lutisse, Marguerite, Marie, Mathilde, Margalie, Mirabel, Nicole, Nicolette, Olive, Oriabel, Patronille, Pernelle, Poette, Rosamonde, Sigilind, Sybylle, Theudechild, Wisigard, Yde.

Surnames: Like the Saxons, Franks only use personal names. These names are often made up of two elements, often linked in some way with the parents’ names. For instance, Aldred and Edith might call their daughter Aldith as some elements were suitable for males and females. These names did not necessarily have any link in meaning between their two elements.
In place of surnames, noteworthy Frankish knights and nobles adopt nicknames based upon their homeland (i.e. de Ganis), traits (i.e. the Just), appearance (i.e. The Fair), or deeds (i.e. of the Long Hunt).
Surnames were not necessary for identification purposes although bynames were sometimes used. Although there was no inherited surname, some aristocratic families were identified by a collective name taken from a famous forebear, such as the Athelings, Gumeningas, Besingas, Baducings, or Guthlacingas; with the final ‘-ing’ element signifying ‘people of’.

Irish
Male Names: Aed, Aedan, Aeducan, Ailgel,Ailill, Airechtach, Amalgaid, Art, Baetan, Baeth, Berach, Berchan, Brion, Bruatur, Carthach, Cathal, Cenn, Cerball, Colcu, Comman, Congal, Cormacc, Daig, Diarmait, Donngal, Dunchad, Echen, Elodach, Eogan, Fachtna, Fedelmid, Finnchad, Flann, Guaire, Imchad, Laegaire, Lorccan, Maine, Murchad, Nathi, Ronan, Russ, Senach, Tadc, Tuathal, Ultan

Female Names: Aibhlinn, Aileen, Beibhinn, Bevan, Blaithnaid, Brigid, Cait, Cron, Derbail, Dunlaith, Eithrie, Finnguala, Flann, Gormlaith, Grainne, Lassar, Mor, Orlaith, Sadb, Siobhan, Sinead, Sorcha, Una

Clan Names: Every Irishman has a loyalty to his Clan. Select one from the lists here. In each name a “Mc” prefix means “son of,” and an “O” prefix means “grandson of or descendant of the person named. However, they actually mean the same thing since even the sons are of ancient times.
Similar names indicate a distant kinship, so that the O’Neils acknowledge a distant kinship with the McNeils. Likewise, clans from different parts of the island who have the same name acknowledge distant kinship.
Each clan is actually native to a very specific part of the kingdom, but no attempt has been made to locate these precisely within each kingdom for this edition.

• Ailech: O’Duffy, O’Mulligan, O’Farren, Mc Nelis, Mc Roarty, O’Kenny, O’Dever, Mc Grath.

• Connacht: O’Conor, O’Flynn, O’Fergus, O’Finan, O’Coyne, Mc Conneely, O’downey, O’Nihil, O’Dea, Mc Keane, Mc Donnell, O’Quinn, O’Brien, Mc Mahon, O’Grady, O’Madden, Mc Nevin.

• Dal Ariade: O’Neill Clanaboy, Mc Alister, O’Lynn, O’Lavery.

• Dal Riada: Mc Donnell, O’Quinn, O’Hara, Mc Neill, Mc Cleary, Mc Quillan, Mc Keown, O’Hood.

• Leinster: O’Conor Faly, O’Dempsey, O’Dunn, O’Byrne, O’Toole, Mc Morrough, Mc Gilpatrick, O’Doyle, O’Hartley, O’Nolan, O’Larkin, O’Shea, O’Duff, O’Ronan, O’Cullen.

• Long Isles (same as Dal Riada): Mc Donnell, O’Quinn, O’Hara, Mc Neill, Mc Cleary, Mc Quillan, Mc Keown, O’Hood.

• Meath: O’Reilly, O’Curry, O’Coffey, O’Connolly, O’Kelly, Mc Auley, Mc Gee, O’Casey, O’Connolly, O’Mulecdy.

• Munster: O’Kennedy, O’Meagher, O’Brien Arra, O’Mulrain, O’Conor Kerry, O’Sullivan Mor, Mc Carthy Muskerry, O’Callaghan, Mc Carthy Reagh, O’Sullivan, Beare, O’Fogarty, O’Noonan, O’Long, O’Shelly, Mc Sweeney.

• Oriel: O’Neill, Mc Nally, Mc Gorman, Mc Mahon, O’Hagan, O’Hanlon, O’Breslin, Mc Ardle.

Pronunciation Guide:
(a) is roughly equivalent to English law
(c) is always hard, roughly equivalent to English cow
(d) is roughly equivalent to English j, as in joy
(e) is roughly equivalent to English veil
(g) is roughly equivalent to English, as in goal
(i) is roughly equivalent to English ee, as in fee
(o) is roughly equivalent to English show
(iu) is roughly equivalent to the English ew, as is rood
(s) is roughly equivalent to English sh, as in short
(t) is roughly equivalent to English ch, as in church
(ei) is roughly equivalent to English vine
(ow) is roughly equivalent to English owl
(ch) is roughly equivalent to Scottish loch

Pict
Male Names: Agnoin, Brude, Buban, Buiann, Cian, Cruithne, Drust, Fathecht, Golistan, Llifiau, Luchtai, Mailcon, Mais, Nechtan, Partolan, Peithan, Talorc, Wid.

Female Names: No female Pictish names have been recorded in history. Use Cymric and Irish names.

Surnames: Pict surnames are usually patronymic, linking a person to his or her father by placing mab (son of) or ferch (daughter of) between a person’s proper name and the father’s name.
Nicknames based on traits (“the loner”), places (i.e. “an Arcach”, meaning of The Orkneys), quirks (i.e. “Clag a’ Bhaile” meaning ‘the town bell’ for a loud person), or occupation (i.e. “Clachair” or stonemason) are also common.

Clan Names: Every Pict has a loyalty to his Clan. The word clan simply means children, and each clan is made up of a number of distinct familial branches that are descended from, or believe themselves to be descended from, a common ancestor. New clans contain septs or branches are founded when a powerful or prominent clansman establishes he own notable familial line within that clan. The clan chief is considered the head, or father, of the entire clan and, upon his death, is succeeded by an heir who is elected by clan members during the chief’s lifetime. Only the chief uses the Clan Name as his surname; all others use their patronymic surname or their given byname.

Roman
Roman citizens usually bore two to three elements in their names: a proper name, a surname, and, at times, an honorific.

Male Names: Albanus, Agorix, Arcavius, Avitus, Belletor, Burcanius, Caletus, Caracturus, Catianus, Cunobarrus, Cervidus, Dagwaldus, Decmus, Donicus, Dumnorix, Egbutius, Elvorix, Galerus, Gessius, Ingenvinus, Isatis, Ivimarus, Luonercus, Litumarus, Leddicus, Lupinus, Maccalus, Macrinus, Magunnus, Marullinus, Metunus, Molacus, Nemnogenus, Nonius, Novellius, Olennius, Pertacus, Primanus, Nertomarus, Sarimarcus, Sudrenus, Tanicus, Taurinus, Trenus, Vepgenus, Vibennis, Vitalinus, Ulprus, Voteporix.

Female Names: Except for the names ending in -rix, all male names can be feminized by changing the ending to “ia”. Thus Arcavius becomes Arcavia.

Surname: The surname or nomen designated a Roman citizen as a member of a family or clan. All members of an extended family share the same surname or nomen, and claimed descent from a common ancestor.
The nomen was an essential element of Roman nomenclature throughout Roman history, although its usefulness as a distinguishing element declined precipitously following the Constitutio Antoniniana, which effectively granted the nomen “Aurelius” to vast numbers of newly enfranchised citizens. Countless other “new Romans” acquired the nomen of important families in this manner during imperial times; in the fourth century Aurelius was surpassed in number by Flavius, and other names became quite common, including Valerius, Claudius, Fabius, Julius, and Junius.
Honorific: Honorific names were also used to distinguish branches of the family from one another, and occasionally, to highlight an individual’s achievement, typically in warfare.
Unlike the surname, which was passed down unchanged from father to son, an honorific or cogname could appear and disappear almost at will. They were not normally chosen by the persons who bore them, but were earned or bestowed by others, which may account for the wide variety of unflattering names that were used as cognames.
Examples of honorifics include Magnus (great), Maximus (greatest), Cicero (chick pea), Rufus (red-haired), Numidicus (from Numidia), Scaevola (left-handed), Eboricus (from York), Augustus (venerable).

Pronunciation Guide: remember that all C’s are hard, like K.

Saxon
Male Names: Aelfric, Aescwine, Bassa, Beorhtric, Caedwalla, Caewlin, Centwine, Cenwalch, Cerdic, Coelred, Coelric, Coelwulf, Coenhelm, Conerad, Conewalch, Coenwulf, Cuthbert, Cuthred, Cuthwulf, Cyneagils, Cynewulf, Cynric, Eadbald, Eadberht, Eadric, Eardwulf, Edwin, Edgert, Ethilfrith, Ethelheard, Ethelred, Ethelwulf, Hengest, Hlothere, Horsa, Ine, Octa, Oeric, Osric, Oswald, Oswine, Oswulf, Oswy, Peada, Penda, Sigebryht, Wihtred, Wulfhere

Female Names: Aelflaed, Aelgifu, Aethelred, Burhred, Cuthburh, Cyneburh, Eadgifu, Eadgyth, Eadhild, Ealhred, Eormenburh, Hereswith, Raedburh, Sexburh, Wihtburh

Surnames: Saxons use personal names that are often made up of two elements, often linked in some way with the parents’ names. For instance, Aldred and Edith might call their daughter Aldith as some elements were suitable for males and females. These names did not necessarily have any link in meaning between their two elements.
For clarity’s sake, Saxon’s will sometimes identify themselves as their father’s son or daughter. As such the sons of Helgi may adopt Helgisson as a surname of sorts, while his daughters would be take Helgisdottir as their informal surname.
In place of surnames, noteworthy Saxon warriors and nobles adopt nicknames based upon their homeland (i.e. of the Dales, Lord of Hadding), traits (i.e. the Honey-Tongued, the Learned, the Reckless), appearance (i.e. The Fair, the Fat, the Tall, the Old, the Lame, Blue-Toothed, Swarthy-Cheeked), or deeds (i.e. of the Long Hunt, Far-Wanderer, Battle-Blessed, Head-Splitter).
Surnames were not necessary for identification purposes although bynames were sometimes used. Although there was no inherited surname, some great families were identified by a collective name taken from a famous forebear, such as the Athelings, Gumeningas, Besingas, Baducings, Guthlacingas, or Volsungs; with the final ‘-ing’ or ‘-ung- element signifying ‘people of’.